Magazine

Story

11.4.2016

Future of the wooly mammoth

Belinda Waymouth

Is Earth’s sixth mass extinction really underway? An expert panel including Stewart Brand, an advocate of de-extinction and co-founder of Revive and Restore, will discuss the causes and consequences of mass species loss and what can be done to protect endangered species.


Review

10.5.2016

L.A. River is a living experiment

Belinda Waymouth

The L.A. River is getting a massive makeover. To many Angelenos, the cement-lined urban waterway has become a symbol of future hope that past environmental harm can be remedied. A number of small revitalization projects are underway, and a planned $1.6 billion Army Corps of Engineers effort would remove concrete and replant native habitat along…


Story

10.4.2016

The $77 billion bug invasion

David Colgan

Ten species of invasive insect account for $77 billion in annual global economic damages, according to the first in-depth study on the subject, published today in Nature Communications. Even that estimate is extremely conservative. Author Franck Courchamp, a French conservation biologist who researched the paper as a visiting professor at UCLA, said reliable studies on…


Review

8.26.2016

Human tales on extinction and endangered species

David Colgan

Ursula Heise was surprised by the animal’s intelligence and ability to communicate. She began observing birds and other animals in nature and thinking about their survival through the lens of her literary expertise. Twenty years later, she shares a home with three green-cheeked Amazon parrots. And she has just written Imagining Extinction—a book that explores…


Story

8.23.2016

Hetch Hetchy gushes over wetlands

Belinda Waymouth

A different story is unfolding at Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park, where water is being released to conserve and restore wildlife. In a state wracked with drought, the Hetch Hetchy is an exception to the rule. Further west, California’s chinook salmon is battling to survive in the Sacramento River, where two dams—Keswick and…


Story

7.28.2016

New endangered goby species honors late UCLA student

David Colgan

Eucyclogobius kristinae—named for the late researcher—officially became its own species on July 29th. Now known commonly as the southern tidewater goby, the species is already endangered, living exclusively in three or four lagoons at Camp Pendleton Marine base in San Diego County. David Jacobs, an affiliated biologist with UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability,…