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Headline

4.12.2017

Phys.org: New labels should reduce food waste

“This is a great idea,” said Michael Roberts, executive director of the UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy and a UC Global Food Initiative subcommittee member. “Most consumers want to be safe and cautious. Too often, they’re throwing food away before it needs to be thrown away.”


Headline

3.29.2017

Discover Magazine: The secret in your sushi

A recent study performed by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA sampled from 26 sushi restaurants in Los Angeles from 2012-2015. Led by Demian A, Willette and Sara E. Simmonds, this study found that a whopping 47% of samples were mislabeled.


Headline

1.31.2017

Los Angeles Business Journal: L.A. Restaurants Could Be the Victims of Fish Fraud

Paul Barber, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the university, said the problem could lie with suppliers, as both restaurants and grocery stores were found to be selling mislabeled fish.


Headline

1.31.2017

Food and Wine: Half your sushi may not be what you think it is

In an email UCLA Professor Paul Barber said they hit a broad cross section of L.A. restaurants that “ran the gamut from some very high end establishments (both large and small) as well as low and middle of the road places.”   


Headline

1.18.2017

TIME: Sushi in L.A. is mislabeled nearly half of the time, study says

Some of the mislabeling may be accidental but much of it was likely done intentionally to save money by providing customers with a cheaper type of fish than they thought they were buying, says study author and UCLA Professor Paul Barber. (Also: LAist, The Huffington Post)


Headline

1.18.2017

KABC-AM: Mislabeling of fish in L.A.’s sushi restaurants

“It really depends on what you order,” said UCLA’s Paul Barber. “With certain things like salmon and tuna, there’s a very high likelihood that when you order that, it is what you receive. 






Headline

8.2.2016

Science Daily: Do eco-friendly wines taste better?

Raise a glass to organic grapes: Study finds eco-certified wine rated higher by wine publications