Topical Tag: Conservation

The Magazine

Events


Lecture Series

Will Farmed Fish Save Our Oceans, Delight Our Palates, and Provide Healthy Food for All?

The Conservation Science, Economics and Operations of Aquaculture

5.25.2017

NOTE: THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. PLEASE WATCH THE LIVE STREAM HERE. Current projections estimate that the global population will surpass nine billion people by 2050 and total food demand will approximately double. Seafood is a major source of protein in many regions, but over 80 percent of the world’s fisheries are depleted or fished beyond capacity. Aquaculture—rearing...


Lecture Series

Panel Discussion: Biodiversity in the Anthropocene

Join the UCLA Botanical Garden for an expert discussion about species that are flourishing in a rapidly changing world

5.18.2017

Biodiversity is undergoing tremendous change at the hands of humanity. As some habitats disappear and many wild organisms face extinction, other species flourish in novel ecosystems. Join us for an expert panel discussion which will examine the current state of biodiversity and the narratives which shape related public opinion and policy as we ask the question: how can we successfully coexist with nature on an increasingly technological planet?

People

Heidy Contreras

Assistant Professor

Department of Biology, University of La Verne

M. Sanjayan

M. Sanjayan

Visiting Researcher

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Luciana Alves

Visiting Researcher

Center for Tropical Research

Gregory Simon

Visiting Researcher, IoES

Associate Professor, University of Colorado, Denver

Projects

Research

Our fellows advance skills and solve environmental problems through hands-on experience, which facilitates engagement, active learning, and a deepening of understanding through the application of knowledge.

Publications


Using DNA barcoding to track seafood mislabeling in Los Angeles restaurants

D. Willette, S. Simmonds, S. Cheng, S. Estevez, T. Kane, H. Neutzel, M. Pilaud, R. Rachmawati, P. Barber

Published Work | 2017 | Conservation Biology


High N, dry: Experimental nitrogen deposition exacerbates native shrub loss and nonnative plant invasion during extreme drought

Justin M. Valliere, Irina C. Irvine, Louis Santiago, Edith B. Allen

Published Work | 2017 | Global Change Biology

In the News

Headline

6.22.2017

Why the World’s Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters

“Ten or twenty years ago most wetlands scientists in most places viewed sediment as a negative,” says Richard Ambrose, a marine ecologist at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Too much sediment would come in and bury the marsh. Now people realize sediment is a resource, and we need it to keep up with sea level rise.”


Student Blog

6.2.2017

The Final Countdown

Spring 2017 - Week 9: Biodiversity


Headline

6.1.2017

New carbon map will help protect the DRC’s rainforests

Researchers were able to map the aboveground biomass in the DRC down to the one-hectare level using high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging, or LiDAR, in combination with satellite imagery and machine learning geospatial algorithms, a method developed by Dr. Sassan Saatchi, an expert on tropical forests and the global carbon cycle at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Video

Open for business in the Congo rainforest

Recently, crew of college students from UCLA and Cameroon left convenience behind and plunged into the rainforest. Their objective: reopen a field station that had been shuttered for two decades, while taking the pulse of local wildlife. Through their efforts and a project from UCLA’s Congo Basin Institute, the Bouamir research station is again open...