Newsroom

Headline

3.24.2017

New York Times: Green necklace’ of trees to help Beijing fight smog

Alex L. Wang, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, who studies Chinese environmental regulations, said although this case was apparently a first for Beijing, regulators in other parts of the country had been using administrative detention.


Headline

3.24.2017

Marketplace: Water, water everywhere in California, but no way to hold onto it

Most of the great sites have been taken, and so the sites that still exist — they might be small, they might be oddly shaped to represent certain engineering designs that are particularly tricky at this stage,” said UCLA’s J.R. DeShazo.


Headline

3.22.2017

The Atlantic: The paradox of defunding the EPA

“It’s really staff intensive to rescind a rule and then replace it,” says Ann Carlson, a professor of environmental law at the University of California Los Angeles. “To the degree that you have a vision about how the agency should operate, you need a staff and leadership.”


Headline

3.20.2017

KPCC-FM: All California children would get lead screening under bill

John Froines, a professor emeritus at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, said screening all children is a good step toward addressing lead contamination, but scientists still disagree on what should be considered safe levels of lead. 


Headline

3.20.2017

KCRW-FM’s “Press Play”: Trump budget could deal a painful blow to California

“A lot of our regulation of air and water quality and greenhouse gases that can cause at climate change is done at the state level by state agencies, but a lot of what those agencies do is they implement federal EPA programs and those programs, of course, rely on funding,” said UCLA’s Sean Hecht. 


Headline

3.20.2017

Christian Science Monitor: Unlikely China ally in pollution fight: public activists

Alex Wang, an assistant professor at the UCLA School of Law who specializes in Chinese environmental law, writes in a soon-to-be published study that the overlapping interests of citizens and the nation’s leaders have “enabled the seemingly paradoxical flowering of disclosure law in China.” 


Headline

3.20.2017

Public Radio International: Trump’s plan for EPA is death by ‘a thousand cuts’

The president can’t do away with the EPA altogether because “there are a bunch of statutes on the books that require EPA to do things: to issue regulations, to enforce laws, to clean up hazardous waste sites and so forth,” says Ann Carlson, a professor of environmental law at the University of California, Los Angeles. 


Headline

3.20.2017

Salon: Polluters could ‘more easily’ commit crimes under cuts

“The cuts are so deep it’s hard to imagine we won’t see real effects in air and water quality,” said Ann Carlson, an environmental law professor at UCLA law. “Individual polluters are going to be able to get away with violating the law much more easily.”


Headline

3.20.2017

Access Hollywood: Courtney Cox celebrates innovation

Courteney Cox, Nigel Lythgoe, James Marsden and more attended the John Salley hosted Innovators for a Healthy Planet gala. (Coverage starts at 1:51)


Headline

3.17.2017

Esquire: It’s the golden age of climate denial

 “…Plants already have CO2, and scientists have developed lots of evidence that rapid accumulation of CO2 in both the atmosphere and ocean will generate a large number of negative effects that will be much more severe as a whole. The bad effects will outweigh the good, said UCLA’s Robert Tripati.


Headline

3.17.2017

Christian Science Monitor: Unlikely China ally in pollution fight: public activists

Alex Wang, an assistant professor at the UCLA School of Law who specializes in Chinese environmental law, writes in a soon-to-be published study that the overlapping interests of citizens and the nation’s leaders have “enabled the seemingly paradoxical flowering of disclosure law in China.” 


Headline

3.14.2017

Phys.org: Climate change puts state’s snowpack in jeopardy in future droughts

“The cryosphere — frozen parts of the planet — has shown the earliest and largest signs of change,” said UCLA climate scientist Alex Hall, who along with study co-author Neil Berg modeled what future California droughts will look like in terms of snowpack loss.