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Headline

2.28.2017

Los Angeles Times: Can California go its own way on federal environmental protections? These lawmakers want to try

“California will undoubtedly test the limits of what it’s possible for a state to do,” said Cara Horowitz, co-director of UCLA’s Environmental Law Clinic. The state, she said, “has made very clear that it sees itself as the environmental resistance in the United States.”


Headline

2.24.2017

Mercury News: Why it’s raining so much in California

“What we’ve seen describes California’s climate. It’s a climate precipitated by extremes,” said Daniel Swain, an atmospheric researcher at UCLA. “The precipitation is driven by the presence or absence of atmospheric rivers, and right now we have an overabundance of them. A few too many.”


Headline

2.24.2017

Smithsonian magazine: Surprising reason the turtle learned to hide its head

“Given that there are only two neck vertebrae, they’re doing an awful lot of reconstructing,” said Brad Shaffer, an evolutionary biologist at UCLA not involved in the new study. However, he adds that the theory will hopefully spark more discussion in the field of turtle research.


Headline

2.22.2017

San Francisco Chronicle: Dams remain in line for bulk of funding

Extremes are what California is likely to see more of, said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and author of the California Weather Blog. “We’ve swung pretty quickly from the most intense drought to literally the wettest winter we’ve observed in a century,” Swain said.


Headline

2.16.2017

Los Angeles Times: L.A. area braces for what could be season’s biggest storm

“The Friday storm in particular could in fact become the strongest of the season in the Los Angeles region,” said UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain.


Headline

2.15.2017

San Francisco Examiner: Line drawn in sand between beach access, protection

Jon Christensen, an adjunct assistant professor at UCLA’s Institute on the Environment and Sustainability, found the condition of the ocean and beaches is personally important to 90 percent of Californians. Another survey of people at Southern California beaches found people want clean sand and water. 


Headline

2.15.2017

KPCC-FM’s “Take Two”: Why Oroville crisis affects Southern California

“What we really need to do as soon as possible is to do a vulnerability assessment of really all our water infrastructure in the state of California,” said UCLA’s Mark Gold.


Headline

2.15.2017

Bloomberg: Why America’s tallest dam is suddenly in danger

“Drought usually ends in flood in this part of the world,” said Daniel Swain, a University of California, Los Angeles climate scientist, “because that’s what it takes to end them.”


Headline

2.15.2017

Los Angeles Times: Oroville Dam dangers remain as new storm approaches

“The Friday storm in particular could in fact become the strongest of the season in the Los Angeles region,” said UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain. 


Headline

2.14.2017

Christian Science Monitor: An Oroville message: As climate shifts, so will water strategies

Precipitation in the northern Sierra Nevada mountain range is 220 percent above normal this winter, making it the wettest on record. But snowpack is just 145 percent above normal, falling short of the snowiest winter. Warmer temperatures are likely to blame for the discrepancy, says Alex Hall, a professor at UCLA. 



Headline

2.8.2017

The New Yorker: L.A.’s mountain lions: dangerous predators or celebrity guests?

The mountain-lion population in the Santa Monica Mountains is in danger of entering an extinction vortex, a downward spiral in which everything starts to fail. “Without our assistance, the Santa Monica Mountain pumas are likely to go extinct,” says Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at UCLA.