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Headline

4.20.2017

Here’s an Interesting New Video Series on Psychology and Climate Change

Climate Lab, a new YouTube series by Vox and the University of California that explores the behavioral science of climate change and attempts to mitigate it, is a smart idea for a series.


Headline

4.20.2017

Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change

“In terms of behavioral change, we need two things,” said Magali Delmas, a professor at the Institute of Environment and Sustainability at UCLA and the Anderson School of Management. “We need first to increase awareness, and then second, we need to find the right motivations for people to change their behavior.”


Blog

4.20.2017

Why Are We So Bad at Talking About Climate Change?

What I learned through Climate Lab, a new video series I’m hosting in partnership with the University of California and Vox, is that most climate change messaging is filled with doom and gloom. This has the opposite effect in getting us to care and take action. Human nature is hard-wired for optimism, and we shut...


Headline

4.19.2017

Vox: How psychology can trick us into keeping Earth habitable

Magali Delmas, a professor at the Institute of Environment and Sustainability at UCLA and the Anderson School of Management is on the hunt for these motivations, looking for simple ways to make climate change personal.


Headline

4.18.2017

Scienmag: The dangers of being a saber-toothed cat in Los Angeles 12,000 years ago

While previous studies of these animals have demonstrated that injuries likely occurred during fierce battles, the UCLA biologists are the first scientists to study enough bones to determine how frequently the injuries occurred.


Headline

4.18.2017

Phys.org: Dangers of being saber-toothed cats 12,000 years ago

“Consequently, we expected injuries in saber-toothed cats would likely be concentrated in the shoulder, anterior ribcage and spine, while those of dire wolves were likely to be more evenly distributed across all four limbs,” said senior author Blaire Van Valkenburgh, a UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology. 


Headline

4.18.2017

KPCC-FM’s “Take Two’: Report washes away uncertainty about L.A. tap water

“I think this year’s annual report from LADWP really emphasizes the fact that you can guarantee that the city of L.A. provides clean, high-quality water to its customers, which is great. Reliable, safe drinking water supply should never be one of them, and they come through on that front,” said UCLA’s Mark Gold.


Headline

4.13.2017

New York Times: Saber-toothed cats paid a stiff price for lunch

Caitlin Brown, a doctoral candidate at UCLA and lead author of the study, along with her colleagues analyzed more than 35,000 saber-toothed cat and dire wolf bones retrieved from the La Brea Tar Pits in L.A. “Most of the injuries were signs that the muscles were overworked or arthritis was in the area,” said Brown.


Headline

4.12.2017

HealthDay: How to protect yourself from air pollution

But there are a number of things you can do to protect yourself and your family from air pollution, said Yifang Zhu. She’s a professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health in Los Angeles.


Headline

4.12.2017

New Scientist: Sabre-toothed tigers in ice-age L.A. had bad back trouble

Blaire Van Valkenburgh, a paleontologist at UCLA, led graduate students to a local resource. The student researchers found a way to map damaged areas on bones and spent months examining more than 35,000 bones from sabre-toothed tigers and the other apex predator that shared its southern California habitat, the dire wolf.


Headline

4.12.2017

Phys.org: New labels should reduce food waste

“This is a great idea,” said Michael Roberts, executive director of the UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy and a UC Global Food Initiative subcommittee member. “Most consumers want to be safe and cautious. Too often, they’re throwing food away before it needs to be thrown away.”


Awards

4.12.2017

UCLA professor wins British Society for Literature and Science’s annual book prize

IoES and Department of English Professor Ursula Heise has been awarded this year’s British Society for Literature and Science (BSLS) prize for best book in the field of literature and science published in 2016. Her book, “Imagining Extinction: The Cultural Meanings of Endangered Species,” explores extinction, endangered species and wildlife conservation through the lens of culture and...