IoES in the News

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12.5.2019

Ann Carlson on GreenTech Media Podcast ‘Political Climate’ — Big Oil on Trial: Where the Climate Lawsuits Currently Stand

In this episode of Political Climate, UCLA law professor Ann Carlson and journalist Emily Atkin  discuss litigation that could cost fossil fuel companies billions. Fossil fuel companies could be facing a Big Tobacco moment.


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12.5.2019

Victoria Sork Study Featured in BBC

Co-author Professor Victoria Sork, from the department of ecology and evolutionary biology at the UCLA explained why the team of researchers felt there was a need to carry out the study. “Trees, which are long-lived, and climate change — which is happening quickly — could be out of sync with each other,” she explained. “The...


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12.5.2019

Alan Barreca Study Featured in SB Dirty South Soccer: Sweltering Heat Means More Babies are Born Early Every Year

Alan Barreca and a colleague used estimate shifts in daily birth rates from United States counties over a 20-year span, a sample including 56 million births. “We estimate that birth rates increase by 5% on days with maximum temperatures about 90 degrees Fahrenheit.”


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12.4.2019

Daniel Swain Quoted in Mashable: California’s Strengthening Storms Mean More Billion-Dollar Disasters

An atmospheric river is a formidable band of moisture (sometimes dubbed a “river in the sky”) that streams over the Pacific Ocean and into the Western U.S., often dousing California. As the globe warms, “you’re raising the ceiling on precipitation potential,” said Daniel Swain. “Atmospheric rivers will be more intense, delivering more water.”


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca Study Featured in Salon: How Climate Change is Causing More Premature Births

Research by Alan Barreca shows that extreme heat correlates with more premature births.  “We realized that the way people had worked at studying the health impacts of extreme heat in third trimester needed a new look,” Barreca told Salon. “So, we came up with an approach where we said, ‘OK, after an unseasonably hot day,...


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca Study Featured in Anthropocene: How Climate Change Could Shorten Pregnancies

Alan Barreca and colleagues used data from global climate models to calculate how future increases in extreme heat are likely to shorten pregnancies. Each additional hot day is likely to affect the timing of at least 822 births.


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca Study Featured in Mother Jones: The Next Generation of Children Will Be Affected by Climate Change Before They’re Even Born

Hot weather increases the risk of early childbirth, which in turn is linked to worse health and developmental outcomes for children, a major new study by Alan Barreca has found.


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca Study Featured in Scary Mommy: Climate Change Is Causing Early Labor In Pregnant Women

Hot weather due to climate change is directly linked to shortened pregnancies and early labor in the U.S., a newly released study by Alan Barreca suggests.


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12.3.2019

Felicia Federico Study Featured in Cronkite News Arizona PBS: California Schools Must Eliminate Lead in Water, But What About Nearby Homes?

California authorities are addressing the problem of lead in drinking water at public schools through a statewide program to test pipes and upgrade plumbing, but experts warn the threat goes well beyond schools – and nearby homes and businesses may unknowingly be affected. “The same water systems tainted by lead that feed into these schools...


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12.3.2019

2019 Pritzker Winner Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim Featured in The European Sting

From the Mbororo pastoralist community, Ibrahim is an expert in how indigenous peoples and particularly women adapt to climate change. She wants to highlight the impact a warming planet is having on communities across Africa. “Climate change is real and it’s not about our future, it’s about our present,” she told the World Economic Forum Sustainable...


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca in MinnPost: Rising Temperatures May Trigger More Premature Births

“We predict more than 1 in 100 births will occur earlier than expected in the U.S. by the end of the century,” said Alan Barreca.


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12.3.2019

Alan Barreca Writes for The National Interest: The Real Risks of Being Pregnant During the Summer

“I’m an economist who has spent much of my decadelong career investigating how weather affects human health, with a focus on child and maternal health. I got started down this career path in 2008 because I wanted to understand why infant health is much worse today in hotter parts of the U.S., like Louisiana. Now, I work...