Neil Berg

Associate Director, Science

Center for Climate Science


Bio

I am an applied climate scientist with the overarching goal of increasing climate resilience and sustainability in the Los Angeles metropolitan area.

My recent research and interests focus on changes in the California hydrological cycle — particularly how snowpack, precipitation, and extreme events may change in the future, and the impacts of these changes on the region’s water resources, energy security, and agricultural productivity. This work involves analyzing global climate models and conducting cutting-edge regional climate simulations using supercomputers.

Recognizing that we live in integrated physical and social systems, I am passionate about extending the results of regional climate simulations to practitioners, policy makers, and officials to guide decision-making and planning efforts across LA. I believe that the co-development of climate resilience solutions between scientists and stakeholders is necessary for mitigating and adapting to changing environmental conditions.

I obtained a PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from UCLA and a BS in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Before returning to UCLA in 2017, I spent two years at the RAND Corporation in their Washington, DC, office, where I served as Program Manager for the NOAA Mid-Atlantic RISA program. Although I am an east coast native, I happily enjoy living and working in sunny and vibrant LA.

Projects

Ensuring the Sustainability of Los Angeles Water Management Under Climate Change

In Fall 2018, the UCLA IoES Center for Climate Science kicked off a new five-year project aimed at improving the sustainability of water management operations and planning in Los Angeles County. Our researchers will work closely with key water agencies to ensure that water resources managers take cutting-edge climate science into account.

Los Angeles Regional Climate Assessment

For more than a decade, the State of California has undertaken periodic scientific assessments with the goal of understanding future climate change impacts on the state. For the first three such assessments, released in 2006, 2009, and 2012, a portfolio of research projects investigated climate change impacts, and the assessment report described the results of...

The Future of Extreme Precipitation in California

Our researchers are investigating the effects of climate change on heavy precipitation events in the state. Specifically, we're focusing on atmospheric rivers, moisture-laden filaments of air that move across oceans and produce heavy precipitation when they make landfall. Understanding how atmospheric rivers are affected in a changing climate is key to smart water planning in the future.

Los Angeles Skyline

Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region

The most comprehensive study of climate change in LA to date, the Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region Project was conducted by Center for Climate Science Faculty Director Alex Hall and his research group between 2010 and 2015. Dr. Hall and his team developed a novel method for bringing global climate model projections to high spatial resolution, creating neighborhood-by-neighborhood projections of future climate over the greater Los Angeles region under different scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions.

Publications

Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on Today’s Sierra Nevada Snowpack and Flood Risk

X. Huang, A. Hall, and N. Berg

Published Work | 2018 | Geophysical Research Letters


Climate Change in the Sierra Nevada: California’s Water Future

K.D. Reich, N. Berg, D.B. Walton, M. Schwartz, F. Sun, X. Huang, and A. Hall

Other | 2018


Significant and inevitable end-of-21st-century advances in surface runoff timing in California’s Sierra Nevada

M. Schwartz, A. Hall, F. Sun, D.B. Walton, and N. Berg

Published Work | 2017 | Journal of Hydrometeorology


Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought

N. Berg and A. Hall

Published Work | 2017 | Geophysical Research Letters


Incorporating Snow Albedo Feedback Into Downscaled Temperature and Snow Cover Projections for California’s Sierra Nevada

D.B. Walton, A. Hall, N. Berg, M. Schwartz, F. Sun

Published Work | 2017 | Journal of Climate


21st-century snowfall and snowpack changes in the Southern California mountains

F. Sun, A. Hall, M. Schwartz, D.B. Walton, and N. Berg

Published Work | 2016 | Journal of Climate


Mid 21st-century precipitation changes over the Los Angeles region

N. Berg, A. Hall, F. Sun, S.C. Capps, D.B. Walton, B, Langenbrunner, and J.D. Neelin

Published Work | 2015 | Journal of Climate


Increased interannual precipitation extremes over California under climate change

N. Berg, A. Hall

Published Work | 2015 | Journal of Climate


California winter precipitation change under global warming in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 ensemble

J.D. Neelin, B. Langenbrunner, J.E. Meyerson, A. Hall, and N. Berg

Published Work | 2013 | Journal of Climate


El Niño–Southern Oscillation impacts on winter winds over Southern California

N. Berg, A. Hall, S.B. Capps, and M. Hughes

Published Work | 2013 | Climate Dynamics