IoES in the News

Headline

5.7.2019

Tom Smith on CBS This Morning News: UN Biodiversity report

UCLA’s Tom Smith spoke with CBS about a new United Nations report that says nature is essential for our existence and a good quality of life, but point to a stark warning: humans are transforming the planet’s natural habitat at an unprecedented rate. Jonathan Vigliotti reports.


Headline

5.7.2019

Monica Smith on KJZZ 91.5

Monica Smith, a professor at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, argues that many of the fundamentals of cities themselves are basically the same as they were several thousand years ago. In her new book “Cities: The First 6,000 Years,” Smith writes that ancient cities and modern ones, in many ways, are very similar.


Headline

4.28.2019

The American Scholar: Five questions about the future of cities

Monica L. Smith, a professor of anthropology at UCLA, specializes in the history of cities with a focus on ancient urban development on the Indian subcontinent. She is the author of A Prehistory of Ordinary People and the forthcoming Cities: The First 6,000 Years. We asked her to pose five questions about the future of...


Headline

4.28.2019

Monica L Smith on Life Elsewhere 88.5 WMNF

Today, more than half the world’s population lives in cities, and it’s predicted that by 2030, 60% of the population of China, 87% of Americans, and 92% in the United Kingdom will be city dwellers. Yet urban inhabitation is a relatively new phenomenon in the timeline of human history. The first cities came into being...


Headline

4.24.2019

J.R. DeShazo on KCRW-FM: California’s green energy policy has generated thousands of jobs

“The state has, in what I tend to call the second wave of climate policies, gone back through and integrated a social justice or environmental equity component in almost every single policy,” said UCLA’s J.R. DeShazo.


Headline

4.23.2019

Congo Basin Institute in Guitar World: Taylor Guitars Makes History with Largest Recorded Planting of West African Ebony Trees

In 2016, Taylor partnered with the Congo Basin Institute to learn more about ebony ecology. The collaboration took form as The Ebony Project and has since produced groundbreaking research, providing the most accurate estimates of the size and scope of ebony’s native range, as well as capturing the first-ever images of insects that pollinate the...


Headline

4.23.2019

“Cities: The First 6,000 Years” By Monica Smith

Today, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities, and it’s predicted that by 2030, 60% of the population in China, 87% of Americans, and 92% of residents in the United Kingdom will be city dwellers. Yet urban inhabitation is a relatively new phenomenon in the timeline of human history—the first cities came...


Headline

4.23.2019

UCLA’s J.R. DeShazo part of a new independent committee focused on U.S. environmental policy

J.R. DeShazo named an inaugural member of the executive committee of the new research entity. Academic experts have formed an independent committee to advise U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policies after the Trump administration disbanded a similar entity. Acting swiftly to protect the integrity of science-driven environmental policy, the newly created External Environmental Economics Advisory Committee...


Headline

4.23.2019

Allison Carruth in Daily Bruin: Inner Peas: What does ‘organic’ really mean? A look into its social, environmental impact

Allison Carruth, a faculty member in the English department and the Institute for Society and Genetics, said the most prominent data surrounding the harmful effects of toxic chemicals used in food production are seen directly in farmworker communities. “Intensive agriculture makes heavy use of pesticides and herbicides,” she said. “This pesticide exposure has multigenerational effects...


Headline

4.23.2019

Holly Jean Buck in MIT Technology Review: The desperate race to cool the ocean before it’s too late

Holly Jean Buck is a fellow at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. This article is an adapted excerpt from her upcoming book After Geoengineering: Climate Tragedy, Repair, and Restoration (September 2019, Verso Books).


Headline

4.23.2019

Jennifer Jay in Saving the West podcast: Urban meats rural

“One thing is clear–we’ve only got this one planet. So we’ve gotta take care of her. And while we figure it out, we’ve all gotta eat. But what’s the best diet, the most sustainable, the food for the future? We speak with UCLA professor, Jenny Jay, who argues for increased veganism -and Joe Morris, of Morris...


Headline

4.23.2019

Michael Ross in Stears Business: Nigeria’s oil curse perpetuates patriarchy

It is well known that oil can be a curse rather than a blessing to resource-rich countries. However, one key aspect omitted from the discussion is how it affects gender rights and opportunities. One of the many tentacles of the natural resource curse is that it hinders female empowerment. Achieving gender parity is a tremendous challenge...