Topical Tag: Water

The Magazine

Climate change puts California’s snowpack under the weather

The Sierra Nevada snowpack, which provides 60 percent of the state’s water via a vast network of dams and reservoirs, has already been diminished by human-induced climate change and if emissions levels aren’t reduced, the snowpack could largely disappear during droughts, according to findings in the study published today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Oroville Dam crisis could be sign of things to come

The recent crisis at Oroville Dam sheds light on an emerging problem for California's aging water resources infrastructure. Professor Alex Hall's research shows that, as temperatures warm in the Sierra Nevada, climate change could precipitate a deluge that will overwhelm a patchwork network of dams and reservoirs that supply 60 percent of the state's water.

Events

Special Event

World Water Day Symposium

Is conservation "worth it" in a post-drought environment?

3.22.2017

Confirmed panelists include: Dr. Stephanie Pincetl and Dr. Erik Porse  | UCLA California Center for Sustainable Communities Tim Becker | Theodore Payne Foundation Janet Hartin | University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources James Del Monaco | Director of Sustainability & Mechanical Engineer, P2S Engineering Grady Lee | Impact 2030  


Lecture Series

The City and The River

The series expands the conversation around urban issues critical to Los Angeles and familiar to designers and thinkers from all over the world.

2.16.2017

The City and The River series is the theme of the 2016-17 joint school debate series that began last year with Drought and Beauty. Each event includes two lectures from prominent landscape architects and allied professionals (one based in L.A., one from elsewhere) followed by a moderated debate on a theme that will change annually. The...


Lecture Series

Oppenheim Lecture: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

2.9.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...

People

Anditya Rahardianto

Assistant Researcher

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department

Larry Lai Headshot

Larry Lai

LiS Student Representative & M.P.H./M.U.R.P. Candidate

Luskin School of Public Affairs and Fielding School of Public Health

Jennifer Taylor Headshot

Jennifer Taylor

Second Year D.Env. Student

Environmental Science and Engineering

Alison Partie

Alison Partie

First Year D.Env. Student

Environmental Science and Engineering

Projects

EPA Urban Waters Civic Action Project 2017

UCLA, LA Waterkeeper, and Constitutional Rights Foundation were selected by EPA under their Urban Waters Small Grants Program to work with four high schools in Los Angeles to conduct a neighborhood-scale assessment of trash and industrial sources of pollutants.    Jefferson High School students created this video to investigate the Compton Creek watershed in the first...

The Future of Extreme Precipitation in California

Our researchers are investigating the effects of climate change on heavy precipitation events in the state. Specifically, we're focusing on atmospheric rivers, moisture-laden filaments of air that move across oceans and produce heavy precipitation when they make landfall. Understanding how atmospheric rivers are affected in a changing climate is key to smart water planning in the future.

Health and Water Conservation Policy: How can California’s water community consider human health while protecting against California’s drought?

Part of an occasional series about the work of UCLA water experts. by Sharona Sokolow California’s current drought is a major crisis. After three years of below average precipitation, over 80% of California is in a state of exceptional or extreme drought. Compounded by unpredictable future weather patterns, melting snowpack, and aging infrastructure for water storage...

Publications

Pulsed marker method for real-time detection of reverse osmosis membrane integrity loss

S Surawanvijit, J Thompson, A Rahardianto, V Frenkel, Y Cohen

Published Work | 2015 | Desalination


Novel design and operational control of integrated ultrafiltration — Reverse osmosis system with RO concentrate backwash

LX Gao, A Rahardianto, H Gu, PD Christofides, Y Cohen

Published Work | 2016 | Desalination


Performance and Economic Evaluation of a Modular Vertical-Flow Wetland for Onsite Residential Bathroom Graywater Treatment

ZLT Yu, A Rahardianto, MK Stenstrom, Y Cohen

Published Work | 2016 | Journal - American Water Works Association

In the News

Headline

3.22.2017

New Scientist: Quarter of California’s snowpack loss is from human-made warming

In 2015, after four years of drought, the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California hit a record low. Global warming is to blame for a quarter of that loss, a UCLA Center for Climate Science study based on climate models suggests.


Headline

3.14.2017

Phys.org: Climate change puts state’s snowpack in jeopardy in future droughts

“The cryosphere — frozen parts of the planet — has shown the earliest and largest signs of change,” said UCLA climate scientist Alex Hall, who along with study co-author Neil Berg modeled what future California droughts will look like in terms of snowpack loss. 


Headline

3.13.2017

San Francisco Chronicle: After near-record storms, signs of El Niño rise

“By any formal metric, this winter was unanticipated,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at UCLA. “The deeper question of why it’s happening is challenging. I don’t think we have a good answer.”