Topical Tag: Climate

The Magazine

Climate change puts California’s snowpack under the weather

The Sierra Nevada snowpack, which provides 60 percent of the state’s water via a vast network of dams and reservoirs, has already been diminished by human-induced climate change and if emissions levels aren’t reduced, the snowpack could largely disappear during droughts, according to findings in the study published today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Oroville Dam crisis could be sign of things to come

The recent crisis at Oroville Dam sheds light on an emerging problem for California's aging water resources infrastructure. Professor Alex Hall's research shows that, as temperatures warm in the Sierra Nevada, climate change could precipitate a deluge that will overwhelm a patchwork network of dams and reservoirs that supply 60 percent of the state's water.

Three outstanding UCLA scientists win Presidential Early Career Awards

Three exceptional young UCLA scientists were honored by President Obama Monday, Jan. 9, with 2017 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their research careers. They are among 102 scientists and engineers in the nation receiving the...

Events

Lecture Series

Oppenheim Lecture: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

2.9.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Special Event

Research Talk: What Climate Change Means for the Sierra Nevada–and California

Presentation and Q&A by Professor Alex Hall

1.24.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Special Event

Drowning World

Presentation by Photojournalist Gideon Mendel, followed by “The Art of Teaching Climate Change” Roundtable

5.12.2016

Award-winning photojournalist Gideon Mendel visited UCLA to present his “Drowning World” series, which documents the impact of flooding events on people across the globe. Following the presentation, scholars and practitioners in climate change education and communication held a roundtable discussion on “The Art of Teaching Climate Change.” The Center for Climate Science co-sponsored the event, and Associate Director Katharine Reich participated in the roundtable.

People

Larry Lai Headshot

Larry Lai

LiS Student Representative & M.P.H./M.U.R.P. Candidate

Luskin School of Public Affairs and Fielding School of Public Health

Jennifer Taylor Headshot

Jennifer Taylor

Second Year D.Env. Student

Environmental Science and Engineering

Alison Partie

Alison Partie

First Year D.Env. Student

Environmental Science and Engineering

Lia Protopapadakis Headshot

Lia Protopapadakis

Second Year D.Env. Student

Environmental Science and Engineering

Projects

The Future of Extreme Precipitation in California

Our researchers are investigating the effects of climate change on heavy precipitation events in the state. Specifically, we're focusing on atmospheric rivers, moisture-laden filaments of air that move across oceans and produce heavy precipitation when they make landfall. Understanding how atmospheric rivers are affected in a changing climate is key to smart water planning in the future.

Resilience Planning

The Resilience Team worked on two components. The first is an assessment of UCLA’s current resilience, which will be measured relative to the Rockefeller Institute’s resilience framework. To produce a cohesive report, the team identified notable faculty, staff, and students who play a key role in UCLA’s resiliency and provided recommendations for the future. The...

Publications

Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought

N. Berg and A. Hall

Published Work | 2017 | Geophysical Research Letters


Abrupt reorganization of North Pacific and western North American climate during the last deglaciation

J. Lora, J. Mitchell, A. Tripati

Published Work | 2016 | Geophysical Research Letters


A tale of two California Droughts: Lessons Amidst Record Warmth and Dryness in a Region of Complex Physical and Human Geography

D. L. Swain

Published Work | 2015 | Geophysical Research Letters

In the News

Headline

3.22.2017

The Atlantic: The paradox of defunding the EPA

“It’s really staff intensive to rescind a rule and then replace it,” says Ann Carlson, a professor of environmental law at the University of California Los Angeles. “To the degree that you have a vision about how the agency should operate, you need a staff and leadership.”


Headline

3.22.2017

New Scientist: Quarter of California’s snowpack loss is from human-made warming

In 2015, after four years of drought, the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California hit a record low. Global warming is to blame for a quarter of that loss, a UCLA Center for Climate Science study based on climate models suggests.


Headline

3.20.2017

KCRW-FM’s “Press Play”: Trump budget could deal a painful blow to California

“A lot of our regulation of air and water quality and greenhouse gases that can cause at climate change is done at the state level by state agencies, but a lot of what those agencies do is they implement federal EPA programs and those programs, of course, rely on funding,” said UCLA’s Sean Hecht. 

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