Center for Climate Science

EVENTS
Special Event

A Climate Series for the Ages

Living with Climate Change

11.16.2017

This fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, in collaboration with UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, has designed a new kind of climate series: a four-night conversation between the L.A. community and some of the world’s experts on all things climate. DATES: October 5 – Climate Change Cliff Notes October 19 – Earth and...



Special Event

Research Talk: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

6.15.2017

When it comes to water, the Sierra Nevada has always been a feast-or-famine environment. As global temperatures climb with human emissions of greenhouse gases, how will this change? What is the future of the Sierra Nevada, and what does it mean for us?


Special Event

Climate Change Town Hall

A Conversation with Congressman Adam Schiff

4.21.2017

On April 21, 2017, Rep. Adam Schiff held a town hall on climate change at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium. Center for Climate Science Director Alex Hall joined the panel, along with UC Riverside’s Francesca Hopkins and Caltech’s Tapio Schneider, to discuss how global climate change will affect us in California — and what we can do...


Special Event

Oppenheim Lecture: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

2.9.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Special Event

Research Talk: What Climate Change Means for the Sierra Nevada–and California

Presentation and Q&A by Professor Alex Hall

1.24.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 2

Understanding Local Groundwater Storage Potential

6.15.2016

The second workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on June 15, 2016, and focused on current and future groundwater basin conditions, management, and rights in the groundwater basins serving Los Angeles County. The event engaged stakeholders and the research community in order to inform both the scientific research and policy analysis and recommendations that UCLA intends to undertake as part of the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge.


Special Event

Drowning World

Presentation by Photojournalist Gideon Mendel, followed by “The Art of Teaching Climate Change” Roundtable

5.12.2016

Award-winning photojournalist Gideon Mendel visited UCLA to present his “Drowning World” series, which documents the impact of flooding events on people across the globe. Following the presentation, scholars and practitioners in climate change education and communication held a roundtable discussion on “The Art of Teaching Climate Change.” The Center for Climate Science co-sponsored the event, and Associate Director Katharine Reich participated in the roundtable.


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 1

Understanding Local Stormwater Capture Potential

2.19.2016

The first workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on February 19, 2016. UCLA faculty and Los Angeles region water managers, planners, and scientists explored the state of stormwater management and planning, the potential to connect surface hydrology and groundwater modeling tools to quantify infiltration, potential ecosystem benefits of stormwater capture, and strategies to incentivize increased capture and infiltration of stormwater. The program consisted of talks and panel sessions by invited speakers, each followed by Q&A periods and discussion by all attendees.

NEWSROOM
Headline

12.3.2018

California’s 2018 Wildfires Have Emitted A Year’s Worth of Power Pollution

“We’ve been lengthening fire season by shortening the precipitation season, and we’re warming throughout,” Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, explained to National Geographic. “That’s essentially what’s enabled these recent fires to be so destructive, at times of the year when you wouldn’t really expect them.”


Headline

12.1.2018

CAMP FIRE CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS, PERHAPS A RECORD SAYS U.S. INTERIOR SEC’Y

Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, said the figure is strikingly high and likely a record for carbon emissions from wildfires in California history.


Headline

11.30.2018

Fire-scarred California just got a new wake-up call: Mud flow risk is high

“The Montecito event was not a particularly strong storm, it just happened to be localized, one (burst of rain) in a bad spot,” Daniel Swain, a UCLA climate scientist, warned. “Those situations are hard to predict. Giant storms are not going to catch us by surprise, but these individual heavy cells can catch us by...


Headline

11.30.2018

California wildfire emissions equal year of power pollution

The 2018 emissions figure for California wildfires is “strikingly high, significant in the context of overall statewide emissions, and likely a record value for single-year direct carbon emissions from wildfires in California history,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.


Headline

11.27.2018

The New Abnormal: Climate Effects on the Fire Season Are Just Beginning

Last year was California’s most destructive fire season — until this year. The Golden State is in the midst of what Daniel Swain, a climate scientist with UCLA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, calls “a multi-year fire siege.” While it’s hard to point to climate change as the distinct cause of any individual...


Headline

11.22.2018

Is California wildfire partly man-made?

US officials have yet to draw conclusions on the cause of the inferno. There is no doubt that the dry Mediterranean climate of California is susceptible to wildfires, but the natural factor is not the major cause. First, because of global warming vegetation tends to dry out more. Statistics show that the autumn of California...


Headline

11.19.2018

California fires: Why there will be more disasters like Paradise

While 3 degrees of warming in the past 40 years might not seem like a lot, it makes a big difference in the moisture levels of plants, said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at UCLA. Moisture levels in vegetation across California remain today at some of the lowest levels ever recorded, even as autumn wind...


Headline

11.15.2018

See how a warmer world primed California for large fires

That vegetation-drying effect compounds with every degree of warming, explains Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, meaning that plants lose their water more efficiently today than they did before climate change ratcheted up California’s temperatures.


Headline

11.14.2018

Drier Autumns Are Fueling Deadly California Wildfires

In a Q&A, California climate scientist Daniel Swain breaks down the influences on the state’s devastating blazes and what the future could bring.


Headline

11.13.2018

When will this terrible wildfire season in California end?

The UCLA IoES Center for Climate Science’s Neil Berg speaks to Mashable about the connection between climate change and the current, particularly destructive wildfire season in California.


Headline

11.13.2018

Climate Scientist Who Fled CA Wildfire: We’re Going to Keep Paying Price If We Ignore Climate Change

About the fire, you know, in some ways, this is a typical late fall, early winter fire event, with very, very high Santa Ana wind speeds, ignition at a time of year when our fuels are absolutely bone dry. And so, these sorts of fires are anticipatable. They would be anticipatable without climate change. What...


Headline

11.13.2018

How do wildfires start? All it takes is a spark

UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain said that “if Northern California had received anywhere near the typical amount of autumn precipitation this year (4-5 inches of rain near the Camp Fire point of origin), the explosive fire behavior and the stunning tragedy in Paradise would almost certainly not have occurred.” It was also very hot: “The entire...