Center for Climate Science

EVENTS
Special Event

A Climate Series for the Ages

Living with Climate Change

10.5.2017

This fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, in collaboration with UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, has designed a new kind of climate series: a four-night conversation between the L.A. community and some of the world’s experts on all things climate. DATES: October 5 – Climate Change Cliff Notes October 19 – Earth and...



Special Event

Research Talk: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

6.15.2017

When it comes to water, the Sierra Nevada has always been a feast-or-famine environment. As global temperatures climb with human emissions of greenhouse gases, how will this change? What is the future of the Sierra Nevada, and what does it mean for us?


Special Event

Climate Change Town Hall

A Conversation with Congressman Adam Schiff

4.21.2017

On April 21, 2017, Rep. Adam Schiff held a town hall on climate change at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium. Center for Climate Science Director Alex Hall joined the panel, along with UC Riverside’s Francesca Hopkins and Caltech’s Tapio Schneider, to discuss how global climate change will affect us in California — and what we can do...


Special Event

Oppenheim Lecture: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

2.9.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Special Event

Research Talk: What Climate Change Means for the Sierra Nevada–and California

Presentation and Q&A by Professor Alex Hall

1.24.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 2

Understanding Local Groundwater Storage Potential

6.15.2016

The second workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on June 15, 2016, and focused on current and future groundwater basin conditions, management, and rights in the groundwater basins serving Los Angeles County. The event engaged stakeholders and the research community in order to inform both the scientific research and policy analysis and recommendations that UCLA intends to undertake as part of the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge.


Special Event

Drowning World

Presentation by Photojournalist Gideon Mendel, followed by “The Art of Teaching Climate Change” Roundtable

5.12.2016

Award-winning photojournalist Gideon Mendel visited UCLA to present his “Drowning World” series, which documents the impact of flooding events on people across the globe. Following the presentation, scholars and practitioners in climate change education and communication held a roundtable discussion on “The Art of Teaching Climate Change.” The Center for Climate Science co-sponsored the event, and Associate Director Katharine Reich participated in the roundtable.


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 1

Understanding Local Stormwater Capture Potential

2.19.2016

The first workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on February 19, 2016. UCLA faculty and Los Angeles region water managers, planners, and scientists explored the state of stormwater management and planning, the potential to connect surface hydrology and groundwater modeling tools to quantify infiltration, potential ecosystem benefits of stormwater capture, and strategies to incentivize increased capture and infiltration of stormwater. The program consisted of talks and panel sessions by invited speakers, each followed by Q&A periods and discussion by all attendees.

NEWSROOM
Headline

9.7.2017

What you need to know about LA’s urban heat problem

Who is measuring the problem and how is LA trying to cool down the city? Urban heat is disproportionate across the county and many residents do not have air conditioning. Learn about the dangerous costs of heat islands and the increase of heat days in this KCRW piece, referencing Alex Hall’s end-of-century warming projections.


Headline

9.5.2017

California Today: Is This What Climate Change Looks Like?

Record high heat waves, multiple blazes, and microbursts all throughout California- is this what climate change looks like? Learn more about Dr. Daniel Swain's thoughts about whether this is correlated with climate change, as featured in the New York Times. 


Headline

7.12.2017

The Trump Administration Wants To Debate Climate Change On TV. Here’s What Scientists Think About It.

Is Scott Pruitt’s plan to televise climate change “debates” a good idea? No, say Center for Climate Science associate director Katharine Reich and a host of climate scientists and policy experts.


Headline

7.6.2017

Who Is the Jon Snow of Climate Change?

Center for Climate Science associate director Katharine Reich and UCLA climate law experts explore the parallels between the HBO hit fantasy saga Game of Thrones and climate change in the real world.


Headline

6.22.2017

The Extreme Heat to Come

Climate researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have created forecasts of how many days of extreme heat — defined as more than 95 degrees — the Los Angeles region could expect if nothing was done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Downtown Los Angeles, for example, now has roughly a week’s worth of extreme heat days a year, said Alex Hall, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.C.L.A.


Headline

5.5.2017

Record snow, record snowmelt?

“The amount of accumulated snow in the Eastern Sierra is large enough that it will almost certainly lead to a flood when it melts and drains into the Owens Valley,” UCLA climate researcher Alex Hall wrote in an e-mail interview.


Headline

5.3.2017

Climate Change Is Causing More Sweltering Summer Days

“In most places, when you get a heat wave now, there is probably a human finger print,” says Daniel Swain, an author of the paper and a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.  


Headline

4.4.2017

Climate Feedback: Analysis of “One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor”

Daniel Swain, Postdoctoral Fellow, UCLA, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability: Overall, this piece accurately describes the findings of a new research paper by Mann et al on linkages between rapid Arctic warming and extreme weather at Earth’s more temperate latitudes.


Headline

3.22.2017

New Scientist: Quarter of California’s snowpack loss is from human-made warming

In 2015, after four years of drought, the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California hit a record low. Global warming is to blame for a quarter of that loss, a UCLA Center for Climate Science study based on climate models suggests.


Headline

3.14.2017

Phys.org: Climate change puts state’s snowpack in jeopardy in future droughts

“The cryosphere — frozen parts of the planet — has shown the earliest and largest signs of change,” said UCLA climate scientist Alex Hall, who along with study co-author Neil Berg modeled what future California droughts will look like in terms of snowpack loss. 


Headline

3.13.2017

Popular Science: How we know there’s climate change, and humans to blame

“Past observations offer a context in which to view today’s climate — one in which Earth’s atmosphere is filled with the largest concentration of carbon dioxide in human history,” says UCLA’s Aradhna Tripati.


Headline

2.24.2017

Sacramento Bee: Oroville Dam shows urgent need for climate adaptation

In this op-ed, UCLA’s Alex Hall and Mark Gold discuss why it’s critical to help California’s infrastructure and communities adapt to climate change.