Center for Climate Science

EVENTS
Special Event

A Climate Series for the Ages

Living with Climate Change

11.16.2017

This fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, in collaboration with UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, has designed a new kind of climate series: a four-night conversation between the L.A. community and some of the world’s experts on all things climate. DATES: October 5 – Climate Change Cliff Notes October 19 – Earth and...



Special Event

Research Talk: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

6.15.2017

When it comes to water, the Sierra Nevada has always been a feast-or-famine environment. As global temperatures climb with human emissions of greenhouse gases, how will this change? What is the future of the Sierra Nevada, and what does it mean for us?


Special Event

Climate Change Town Hall

A Conversation with Congressman Adam Schiff

4.21.2017

On April 21, 2017, Rep. Adam Schiff held a town hall on climate change at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium. Center for Climate Science Director Alex Hall joined the panel, along with UC Riverside’s Francesca Hopkins and Caltech’s Tapio Schneider, to discuss how global climate change will affect us in California — and what we can do...


Special Event

Oppenheim Lecture: California’s Climate Future

Water and the Sierra Nevada

2.9.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Special Event

Research Talk: What Climate Change Means for the Sierra Nevada–and California

Presentation and Q&A by Professor Alex Hall

1.24.2017

Over the past few years, Californians have seen first-hand the consequences of hotter-than-normal temperatures and a smaller-than-normal Sierra Nevada snowpack, including historically low reservoir levels, dying trees, and increased wildfire risk. You’ve probably wondered, “If things are like this now, what will they be like in the future, as the climate continues to change?” UCLA...


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 2

Understanding Local Groundwater Storage Potential

6.15.2016

The second workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on June 15, 2016, and focused on current and future groundwater basin conditions, management, and rights in the groundwater basins serving Los Angeles County. The event engaged stakeholders and the research community in order to inform both the scientific research and policy analysis and recommendations that UCLA intends to undertake as part of the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge.


Special Event

Drowning World

Presentation by Photojournalist Gideon Mendel, followed by “The Art of Teaching Climate Change” Roundtable

5.12.2016

Award-winning photojournalist Gideon Mendel visited UCLA to present his “Drowning World” series, which documents the impact of flooding events on people across the globe. Following the presentation, scholars and practitioners in climate change education and communication held a roundtable discussion on “The Art of Teaching Climate Change.” The Center for Climate Science co-sponsored the event, and Associate Director Katharine Reich participated in the roundtable.


Symposium

LA’s Water Resource Future Workshop Series, Part 1

Understanding Local Stormwater Capture Potential

2.19.2016

The first workshop in the LA's Water Resource Future Series was held on February 19, 2016. UCLA faculty and Los Angeles region water managers, planners, and scientists explored the state of stormwater management and planning, the potential to connect surface hydrology and groundwater modeling tools to quantify infiltration, potential ecosystem benefits of stormwater capture, and strategies to incentivize increased capture and infiltration of stormwater. The program consisted of talks and panel sessions by invited speakers, each followed by Q&A periods and discussion by all attendees.

NEWSROOM
Headline

5.31.2018

Clouds are disappearing in Southern California, and we’re not totally sure why

"If you put lots of concrete and buildings on the surface, you do change the properties of the local microclimate," Daniel Swain said to Mashable.


Headline

5.28.2018

Siberian bogs may play a crucial role in greenhouse gas

Total rainfall might not change much averaged across these sharp shifts between very dry and very wet years, but “it doesn’t just wash out in the end,” said Daniel Swain to MIT Technology Review.


Headline

5.9.2018

Precipitation whiplash and climate change threaten California’s freshwater

The Washington Post reports on big changes coming to Sierra snowpack, highlighting recent research by Alex Hall, Daniel Swain, and colleagues at the IoES Center for Climate Science.


Headline

4.23.2018

Climate change will make California’s drought-flood cycle more volatile, study finds

“We really need to be thinking seriously about what we’re going to do about these risks,” Daniel Swain, IoES/ climate scientist told the LA Times about the findings in a new published study he led.


Headline

4.2.2018

The Sierra Nevada snowpack will be 64% smaller by the end of this century. We need to prepare now

“We’re going to lose a lot of snow to climate change. Equally worrisome, California’s water infrastructure is not resilient enough to make up for the loss.” Alex Hall & Katharine Reich of the UCLA Center for Climate Science authored an LA Times Op-Ed piece about their findings and suggestions for solutions.


Headline

12.11.2017

California’s Future In The Age Of Wildfires

Boston’s NPR News Station WBUR 90.9 featured IoES Center for Climate Science director, Alex Hall as a guest where he said the conditions causing wildfires in California tracks with global warming predictions.


Headline

12.11.2017

Wind is the culprit in 2017’s horrific wildfire season

Did climate change diminish or strengthen the Santa Ana winds of Southern California? “I would say there’s not high confidence in any of these results because they do conflict . . . What isn’t controversial is that we expect [Santa Anas] to be hotter and drier,” according to climate scientist Alex Hall to the LA Times.


Headline

12.9.2017

Southern California is burning. Is climate change to blame?

Climate scientists Daniel Swain and Alex Hall spoke with 89.3 KPCC regarding whether there was a connection between climate change, the California wildfires, and the Santa Ana winds. 


Headline

12.7.2017

In California fires, a starring role for the wicked wind of the West

IoES’ Allison Carruth, Daniel Swain, and Alex Hall are featured in Science magazine’s article on the wicked wind of the West- the Santa Ana winds that have caused massive damage in Southern California. 


Headline

11.24.2017

A simple but seldom-used tactic to prevent wildfires: Turn off the power grid when winds pick up

Alex Hall discusses Santa Ana winds and forecasters’ ability to predict wind activity and fire risk.


Headline

11.13.2017

Will we be ‘wiped out?’ How climate change is affecting California

When the snow disappears, California will lose what for decades has acted as a natural storage system. Alex Hall, a UCLA professor whose research focuses on reducing uncertainties associated with climate change, said there is mounting evidence that the pattern of long droughts followed by big wet years will become more exaggerated.


Headline

11.2.2017

‘It can become unlivable.’ How Jerry Brown is planning for raging fires and extreme heat

Parfrey is part of a regional climate action and sustainability collaboration at the University of California, Los Angeles, where professor Alex Hall led a groundbreaking study that found climate change will push up temperatures by an average of 4 to 5 degrees by the middle of the century. The number of days where temperatures climb above 95 degrees will roughly double on the coast, triple in downtown Los Angeles and quadruple in the valley.