Laboratory for Environmental Narrative Strategies

NEWSROOM

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Ursula Heise in South Pasadena Review: Squawk of the Town

“They always begin to move out at first light and back to their roosts about 45 minutes before sunset. It is a sublime experience to hear and see them,’’ said Heise, who is co-founder of the Laboratory for Environmental Narrative Strategies / Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA.


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Jon Christensen in Los Angeles Sentinel: New UCLA Study – State Makes Progress On Goal To Guarantee Water As A Human Right

In 2012, California became the first state in the country to declare that “Every human being has the right to safe, clean, affordable and accessible water” when the state legislature inserted that statement into its state water code. Now, a new UCLA study finds, the state may be making progress on turning that goal into...


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Jon Christensen in Mirage News: Neighborhoods getting new parks could prevent displacement with targeted policies

UCLA researcher Jon Christensen with University of Utah professor Alessandro Rigolon found policies that might help reduce “green gentrification,” that is, the displacement of residents and small businesses when parks are built or revitalized in low-income communities. In a new report, they identified 26 beneficial parks-related anti-displacement strategies. They recommend that park agencies and park...


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Jon Christensen in Mirage News: Neighborhoods getting new parks could prevent displacement with targeted policies

UCLA researcher Jon Christensen with University of Utah professor Alessandro Rigolon found policies that might help reduce “green gentrification,” that is, the displacement of residents and small businesses when parks are built or revitalized in low-income communities. In a new report, they identified 26 beneficial parks-related anti-displacement strategies. They recommend that park agencies and park...


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Jon Christensen in City Lab: How to Build a New Park So Its Neighbors Benefit

The Los Angeles River only intermittently resembles an actual river, even though that’s what the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers entombed in concrete in the 1930s. Since then, its 51-mile course has been a trickling flood channel, the scene of countless movie car chases, and a punchline about how artificial L.A. can seem. The results...